Articles

  • Most unplanned fires have a drastic effect on a pasture. Fire changes the plant composition and reduces growth and carrying capacity in the following season.

  • As a livestock owner, you need to be prepared, and have good plans to manage animals during a fire and in the recovery period. It is your responsibility to care for your animals' welfare.

  • Strong fires will cause significant damage to bush on farms and may devastate revegetation areas.

  • After farm fires, protect your water supply from contamination.

  • Following a fire, the risk of water erosion is greatly increased on bare paddocks.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) provides this information to support managers and others suffering from the effects of fire on the farm.

  • Agistment is an option for removing livestock from a property, for a number of reasons – after a fire, when paddock feed is inadequate, to spell pastures, or to finish livestock for sale on better

  • Western Australia's (WA) climate has changed over the last century, particularly over the last 50 years. Average temperature has risen about 1°C.

  • Wind and water erosion risk is increased after fire removes groundcover and some seed reserves.

  • Managing farm biosecurity following a fire, flood or dry season is a balance of caring for livestock and paddocks while limiting the introduction of new pests, diseases or weeds onto the property.