Rangelands

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development works with landholders in Western Australia’s rangeland regions to achieve sustainability through catchment and regional-scale monitoring, providing advice on how to address existing issues, and through developing and improving sustainable production systems.

Our rangelands are complex and extensive ecosystems that are managed by a diverse range of individuals, families and corporations. About three-quarters of Australia is classified as rangelands, with WA’s rangeland region extending across a variety of climatic and resource conditions.

Articles

  • Creeping cassia (Senna hamersleyensis) is one of many plant species found in t

  • This information is a resource for pastoral lessees, station managers and others to help identify plants and assess pasture condition and trend in the shrublands of Western Australia.

  • Rattlepods (Crotalaria spp.) are some of the many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

  • Black speargrass (Heteropogon contortus) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

  • Native millet (Panicum decompositum) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

  • White grass (Sehima nervosum) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

  • Native pea (Rhynchosia minima) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

  • This information is a resource for pastoral lessees, station managers and others to help identify plants and assess pasture condition and trend in the Kimberley, Western Australia.

  • Hard spinifex (Triodia intermedia) is one of many plant species found in the Western Australian rangelands. This page provides a summary of the plant's value for pastoralism.

  • Rangeland regeneration has the potential to sequester large amounts of carbon because of the large areas involved. Pastoral regeneration would also have extensive environmental benefits.

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