Waterlogging

Waterlogging occurs when there is too much water in a plant’s root zone, which decreases the oxygen available to roots. Waterlogging can be a major constraint to plant growth and production and, under certain conditions, will cause plant death. This constraint may not be apparent until the whole soil profile is saturated and water appears on the surface. The department provides landholders with technical information and support on management options to recognise and reduce the impacts of waterlogging.

Articles

  • Waterlogging is a common problem in the agricultural soils of south-west Western Australia in the wetter months of winter.

  • Waterlogging causes soil structure collapse in sodic soils, because the clay particles holding soil particles together disperse.

  • Saline lands in Western Australia (WA) often suffer winter waterlogging, with the levels of salinity and depth to watertable varying markedly both spatially and between seasons.

  • Relief wells can provide water resources and help reduce the severity and extent of waterlogging and salinity caused by leaky artesian systems.

  • Raised beds are a long-term option for waterlogged sites and increasing crop yield on target areas. We recommend that raised beds are part of a whole-farm water and salinity management program.

  • Members of the public can lodge a complaint about observed land management with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation in Western Australia, and the Commissioner will then investigate the c

  • This page lists species commonly found on or near saline land in southern Western Australia. These species can be used as indicators of the level of salinity and waterlogging on the site.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) carries out the requirements of the Soil and Land Conservation Act 1945 to mitigate and prevent land degradation throu

  • Regulation 6 of the Soil and Land Conservation Regulations 1992 applies to all types of drainage, including groundwater pumping, within the Peel–Harvey Catchment Area.

  • Waterlogging is widespread in winter in the agricultural areas of Western Australia and is a major factor reducing crop yields, especially in wet years.