Production & postharvest

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development contributes to the productivity, profitability and sustainability of plant-based agriculture. From broad scale dryland cropping systems to intensive irrigated production, we work with industry and business to address challenges in plant production through research and development, knowledge transfer and government policy settings.

Articles

  • CSBP oat nutrition trial showing oat crop with symptoms of potassium deficiency

    Potassium is required for photosynthesis, transport of sugars, enzyme activation and controlling water balance within plant cells.

  • Oat plants showing symptoms of acute phosphorous deficiency including necosis moving down from old leaf tip

    Nearly all soils in Western Australia are phosphorus deficient in their natural state but the continual use of phosphorus fertiliser means acute deficiency in broadacre crops is rare, with the exce

  • Smaller paler plants with fewer tillers

    Nitrogen deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency in oats especially during cold, wet conditions and in well-drained soils in high rainfall areas.

     

  • Patches of pale stunted wilted plants

    Oats are very susceptible to manganese (Mn) deficiency, which produces a condition called 'grey speck'.

  • Young leaves turn pale green and wilted, then die back from the tip

    Most soils in Western Australia were copper deficient in their natural state.

  • The oaten hay market in Western Australia has developed significantly in recent years.

  • Oats in Western Australia are grown for grain, hay, grazing or silage. Each year between 250 000 and 350 000 hectares are sown for grain production, and 113 000 hectares for hay production.

  • The oat industry delivers nearly $200 million to the state economy each year through oats for human consumption and feed.