Livestock management

Management of livestock must take into account variable seasonal factors, fluctuating markets and declining terms of trade. The most successful producers have a good knowledge of market requirements, matching product quality to suit. There are many factors that can determine the productivity and profitability of a livestock enterprise. These include the supply and quality of feedstuffs, the use of the most appropriate genetics, ensuring high health standards, optimising housing or environmental conditions, meeting quality assurance requirements, and having a sound knowledge of market requirements. This requires good communication along the value chain.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has technical expertise in a range of areas related to livestock management but acknowledges that there are many other sources of information that producers should be encouraged to seek out. There are many grower groups who play an important role in encouraging discussion amongst producers to improve adoption of new technology, as do private consultants and university scientists.

Articles

  • The feed requirements of a ewe with a lamb at foot are higher than if the ewe and lambs are fed separately. In a difficult season with short feed supplies, it is better to early-wean lambs from the

  • Lifetimewool was a national research, development and extension project that delivered profitable and practical guidelines for managing Merino ewes in the Australian wool industry.

  • A grower suvey and benefit cost analysis on the State Barrier Fence has demonstrated the positive impact the fence is having on wild dog management.

  • To ensure sheep are in the right condition at the right time, they should be frequently monitored and their nutrition adjusted throughout the year.

  • The 100%+ Club celebrates the success, expertise and contribution of Western Australia’s leading sheep producers who achieve a whole-farm average marking percentage of at least 100%, assisting to r

  • Inspection of the intestines and associated lymph nodes of adult sheep is one of the most sensitive and cost-effective ways of detecting early ovine Johne's disease (OJD) infection on a property.

  • Ovine Johne's disease (OJD) is a slow-moving, progressive disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

  • Ovine Johne's disease (OJD) is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (commonly referred to as Mycobacterium paratuberculosis).

  • Ovine Johne's disease (OJD) is a serious wasting disease that affects mainly sheep, and to a lesser extent goats.

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