Livestock management

Management of livestock must take into account variable seasonal factors, fluctuating markets and declining terms of trade. The most successful producers have a good knowledge of market requirements, matching product quality to suit. There are many factors that can determine the productivity and profitability of a livestock enterprise. These include the supply and quality of feedstuffs, the use of the most appropriate genetics, ensuring high health standards, optimising housing or environmental conditions, meeting quality assurance requirements, and having a sound knowledge of market requirements. This requires good communication along the value chain.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has technical expertise in a range of areas related to livestock management but acknowledges that there are many other sources of information that producers should be encouraged to seek out. There are many grower groups who play an important role in encouraging discussion amongst producers to improve adoption of new technology, as do private consultants and university scientists.

Articles

  • This tool can be used to estimate the supplementary feed requirements of a sheep enterprise for a single year. 

  • Confinement feeding (also referred to as lot feeding or feedlotting) is an intensive feeding system in a confined area where all, or the majority of, feed and water is supplied to animals.

  • Dry pastures in Western Australia provide good early feed after senescence but rapidly become unable to maintain stock.

  • The new on-farm technology activity was part of the Sheep Industry Business Innovation project and completed a series of case studies on sheep producers who have successful

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is assisting northern beef business decision-making through the provision of seasonally relevant information, including forecas

  • This article provides information on the requirements for keeping fallow and red deer species in Western Australia.

  • Some pig owners may not be aware that feeding meat and meat products to pigs is illegal in Australia because it could introduce devastating diseases to pigs and other livestock.

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious crop stres

  • Pigs are much more sensitive to heat than other animals so during periods of hot weather it is important to look at ways to reduce heat stress.

  • Australian sweet lupins (Lupinus angustifolius L.) are currently utilised as a valuable protein source in pig diets.

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