Livestock management

Management of livestock must take into account variable seasonal factors, fluctuating markets and declining terms of trade. The most successful producers have a good knowledge of market requirements, matching product quality to suit. There are many factors that can determine the productivity and profitability of a livestock enterprise. These include the supply and quality of feedstuffs, the use of the most appropriate genetics, ensuring high health standards, optimising housing or environmental conditions, meeting quality assurance requirements, and having a sound knowledge of market requirements. This requires good communication along the value chain.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has technical expertise in a range of areas related to livestock management but acknowledges that there are many other sources of information that producers should be encouraged to seek out. There are many grower groups who play an important role in encouraging discussion amongst producers to improve adoption of new technology, as do private consultants and university scientists.

Articles

  • The productivity of sheep is largely governed by the amount of pasture they eat and this is influenced by the quantity of the pasture on offer and its quality.

  • Goats in Western Australia are required to be identified by the age of six months or before they leave the property of birth, whichever occurs first.

  • Early recognition of disease is one of the most important factors influencing the control of disease and the reduction of its impact on industry and the community.

  • Antimicrobial resistance threatens the effective prevention and treatment of an increasing range of infections in humans and animals caused by bacteria, parasites and viruses.

  • Wool growers can achieve their breeding objectives by retaining superior breeding stock and by choosing superior rams.

  • Ovine campylobacteriosis is an infectious disease of breeding ewes causing abortion in late pregnancy. It is caused by the bacteria Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus.

  • Copper is an essential trace element for animals needed for body, bone and wool growth, pigmentation, healthy nerve fibres and white blood cell function.

  • This report details the results of the 2014 Western Australian producer survey, done as part of a national survey conducted by the Sheep Cooperative Research Centre (Sheep CRC), for the purpose of

  • The demand for high value agricultural produce continues to increase and provides great opportunity to Australian agriculture.

  • All ruminants (including sheep, cattle and goats) require cobalt in their diet for the synthesis of vitamin B12.

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