Plant biosecurity

The mission of Western Australia's plant biosecurity programs is to safeguard plant resources from exotic and established pests and diseases. The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) has adopted a 'biosecurity continuum' approach with pre-border, border and post-border biosecurity strategies as integral components of this approach.

The aim of DAFWA’s approach is to identify key threats to productivity, sustainability and market access and outline preventive and response strategies.

The management of biological risks to market access, product safety, quality, productivity and sustainability is a shared responsibility and can be managed together and cost-effectively by means of partnerships between industry, community and government.

DAFWA’s biosecurity policies and operations are targeted to facilitate safe trade, tourism and commodity movement whilst reducing exposure of the State's plant resources to exotic biological risks.

Articles

  • Surveillance and diagnosis for pests and diseases in the Western Australian grape industry was a transformational project to boost the early detection of exotic pests and disease incursions and enh

  • Late blight (Phytophthora infestans) is considered the most devastating disease of potatoes worldwide and caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840s.

  • Bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum) is a serious disease of potatoes that can cause crop losses of more than 90%.

  • Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a very damaging virus disease of tomato crops in tropical and warm temperate regions of the world, causing losses of up to 100%.

  • Potato virus Y tuber necrosis strain (PVYNTN) causes a serious disease of potatoes called potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease which results in dark unsightly rings on tubers.

  • Onion rust (Puccinia allii) is a disease of plants in the onion family, including onions, garlic, chives, spring onions and leeks.

  • Citrus gall wasp is a pest that affects all citrus species. Citrus tree owners are encouraged to implement control measures on their property to reduce the threat to the citrus industry in Western

  • Queensland fruit fly is not present in Western Australia, but is occasionally detected and requires an eradication response to contain and prevent further spread.

  • Pursuant to section 44 of the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (the Act) the Director General of Agriculture and Food granted temporary approval for new and alternative requ

  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum is a bacterial plant pathogen that is exotic to Australia. Currently five haplotypes have been described: haplotypes A and B from solanaceous crops suc

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