Climate & weather

Enabling farm businesses to better manage the increasing seasonal variability is critical for the success of the Western Australian agrifood sector. The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is enabling farm businesses to make more informed planning and financial decisions on weather and climate risks. These decisions range from short-term tactical decisions, through to managing strategic planning for climatic futures. The development of improved weather data and seasonal forecasting tools are designed to assist you to better manage and take full advantage of the opportunities related to seasonal variability and climate change.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services has launched a new website; emergency.wa.gov.au. This website will replace the existing alerts and warnings websites from DFES and Parks and Wildlife, enabling people to get critical public information during fire, flood, storm, earthquake, tsunami and emergencies involving hazardous materials.

Articles

  • This page provides seasonally relevant information on conditions and management options for May, June and July 2019 in the agricultural areas of Western Australia (WA).

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious crop stres

  • Climate change in south-western Western Australia is a reality. There have been increased temperatures, decreased annual rainfall and increased climate variability.

  • The State Government has made a $5 million investment in Doppler technology, as part of the $75 million Agricultural Infrastructure Investment Fund, to provide complete Doppler radar coverage acros

  • Climate projections for Western Australia (WA) are that average annual temperature will increase by 1.1–2.7°C in a medium-emission scenario, and 2.6–5.1°C in a high-emission scenario by the end of

  • Plant available soil water graphs show the amount of soil water accumulated from the start of summer (1 November) through the grain growing season and can be used as a tool in the seasonal decision

  • The extreme weather events tool uses data from DPIRD's extensive weather station network to map extreme temperatures, either below or above a specified threshold.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides up-to-date information about the coming season and its potential impacts on cropping and agriculture.

  • The potential yield tool uses seasonal rainfall and decile finishes, calculated from historical data, to calculate the maximum wheat yield possible in the absence of any other constraints.

  • All agricultural industries in Western Australia will need to deal with some level of climate change in the coming decades. The effects of climate change will vary regionally and by enterprise, wit

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