Pests

Animal pests, both vertebrates (backbone) and invertebrates (no backbone), can have an adverse impact on agriculture, the natural environment and even our lifestyle. Animal pests may be exotic animals which are introduced, either accidentally or deliberately. Native animals may also be pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pests search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Several species of paper wasps are found in Australia, however only the yellow paper wasp, Polistes dominulus, and the common paper wasp, Polistes humilis, are widespread in south

  • Presentations on recent activities of the national project, Pests and diseases of truffles and their host trees in Australia, were given at the Australian Truffle Grower Association (ATGA) annual c

  • DDLS - Entomology services provides expertise in invertebrate identification as well as helping to facilitate domestic and international trade and assists in protecting the biosecurity of Western A

  • Snails cause damage to citrus orchards by feeding on fruit and leaves. Snail management is a multi-step process that involves both cultural and chemical control.

  • Invertebrate pests can cause extensive damage to truffles.

  • This page summarises the main factors to consider when planning or managing a canola crop.

  • Queensland fruit fly is not present in Western Australia, but is occasionally detected and requires an eradication response to contain and prevent further spread.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, together with Recognised Biosecurity Groups and other community groups, is seeking landholder views on controlling wild rabbits and fe

  • Yellow-winged locusts (Gastrimargus musicus) are native insects, distinguished by bright yellow wings, they are 35-50mm in length when mature and make a distinctive clicking noise when fly

  • Every year, at the end of July/beginning of August, volunteer farmers, agronomists and some Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) staff commence weekly pheromone trappin

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic