Oats

The Western Australian oat industry generates about $200 million for the state economy each year through the production of milled (rolled) oats for human consumption and feed oats and oaten hay for livestock production.

The major markets for Australian milling oats are Mexico, North Asia, South-East Asia and South Africa.

Western Australian feed oats are well received by international markets, particularly the growing Middle Eastern and Japanese race horse industries.

WA produces about 50% of Australia's export hay – most of which is sent to the Japanese dairy industry. 

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is a partner within the National Oat Breeding Program, which is responsible for breeding and developing new oat grain and hay varieties with superior quality. 

Articles

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Seed dressing and in-furrow fungicides contain active ingredients for the control or suppression of seed-borne diseases and some fungal root rots in cereal crops.

  • Export hay fits into most of the accepted cropping rotatons and helps reduce weed seed banks, overcomes herbicide resistance and provides a break from traditional chemical regimes in addition to gi

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's 2019 Oat Variety Sowing Guide provides a comparison of grain yield, grain quality, hay yield, hay quality, herbicide tolerance and di

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's 2018 Oat Variety Guide provides a comparison of grain yield, grain quality, hay yield, hay quality, herbicide tolerance and disease r

  • This series of video tutorials has been produced to provide advice about the best ways to monitor and sample crops to diagnose and overcome constraints to crop production.

  • Some time ago several Western Australian farmers have stored grain underground with minimal deterioration for up to 11 years.

  • Grain stored on farms for seed or livestock feed is an important investment. Protecting the grain from insect attack can be regarded as an exercise in income protection.

  • Management of weeds, disease and nitrogen nutrition are ongoing challenges that limit yield potential.

  • The Western Australian grain industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy.

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic