Weeds

Weeds pose a serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production.

In 2006/07, each Western Australian agricultural business spent an average of $29 376 ($341 million total) on weed control (Australian Bureau of Statistics).

Weed control is a shared responsibility between landholders, grower groups, biosecurity groups and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development.

To protect WA’s agriculture, the department:

  • works with landholders, grower groups, community groups and biosecurity groups
  • regulates weeds under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007
  • provides a weed identification service
  • provides a predictive simulation tool called weed seed wizard
  • provides information on weed control, crop weeds, regulated/declared plants and herbicides
  • contributes to social science through weedwatcher.

For advice on weeds search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • In Western Australia, competition from 7-90 capeweed plants per square metre in a wheat crop can reduce crop yield by 28-44% and net return by 25-76%.

  • The most accurate way to estimate the weed population of a paddock is to count the number of plants in an area of known size at a number of locations.

  • The Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS) provides advisory and identification services on animal and plant pests, weeds and diseases that impact Western Australia's agriculture and food ind

  • Options for control of winter broad leaved weeds, in pastures, is a common inquiry. A fairly reliable method is spray grazing.

  • Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) is a declared plant that is toxic to both humans and livestock.

  • Introducing new plants to an area can have positive and negative effects on the environment, economy and community.

  • Doublegee or spiny emex is a significant weed in Western Australia. It is a vigorous annual herb with a strong tap root and a long, fleshy, hairless stem.

  • Wild oats (Avena fatua and A. ludoviciana) represent a large cost to cropping. Wild oats are highly competitive and when left uncontrolled can reduce wheat yields by up to 80%.

  • Flaxleaf and tall fleabane (Conyza spp.) are emerging weeds in Western Australia, germinating in spring and becoming major weeds in summer.

  • Preventing weed seed set provides an opportunity to control weed seed set in the pasture, late fallow, late stubble and in-crop phases.

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