Rangelands

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development works with landholders in Western Australia’s rangeland regions to achieve sustainability through catchment and regional-scale monitoring, providing advice on how to address existing issues, and through developing and improving sustainable production systems.

Our rangelands are complex and extensive ecosystems that are managed by a diverse range of individuals, families and corporations. About three-quarters of Australia is classified as rangelands, with WA’s rangeland region extending across a variety of climatic and resource conditions.

Articles

  • This information is a resource for pastoral lessees, station managers and others to help identify plants and assess pasture condition and trend in the Pilbara rangelands of Western Australia.

  • Fire is integral to many ecosystems in the Western Australian rangelands.

  • Climate change will affect each pastoral region in different ways.

  • Anyone wanting to undertake a carbon farming project to sell carbon offsets has to use an approved methodology to account for the carbon sequestered.

  • Strategic savanna fire management can be used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, protect fodder and infrastructure, and potentially attract payment for stewardship activity.

  • Carbon farming is the deliberate set of agricultural practices or land uses to increase carbon stored in the soil and vegetation (sequestration) and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from livestoc

  • There are many benefits from monitoring and assessing pastoral rangeland condition, and monitoring can be done at several levels to meet the needs of rangeland managers, researchers and government

  • Landowners who wish to protect and manage native vegetation on their property may enter into an agreement (covenant) with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation under s30 of the Soil an

  • This information is a resource for pastoral lessees, station managers and others to help identify plants and assess pasture condition and trend in the shrublands of Western Australia.

  • Rangeland regeneration has the potential to sequester large amounts of carbon because of the large areas involved. Pastoral regeneration would also have extensive environmental benefits.