Livestock management

Management of livestock must take into account variable seasonal factors, fluctuating markets and declining terms of trade. The most successful producers have a good knowledge of market requirements, matching product quality to suit. There are many factors that can determine the productivity and profitability of a livestock enterprise. These include the supply and quality of feedstuffs, the use of the most appropriate genetics, ensuring high health standards, optimising housing or environmental conditions, meeting quality assurance requirements, and having a sound knowledge of market requirements. This requires good communication along the value chain.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has technical expertise in a range of areas related to livestock management but acknowledges that there are many other sources of information that producers should be encouraged to seek out. There are many grower groups who play an important role in encouraging discussion amongst producers to improve adoption of new technology, as do private consultants and university scientists.

Articles

  • Blue-green algae are a group of algae including Nodularia spumigena, Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis.

  • Some pig owners may not be aware that feeding meat and meat products to pigs is illegal in Australia because it could introduce devastating diseases to pigs and other livestock.

  • Pigs are much more sensitive to heat than other animals so during periods of hot weather it is important to look at ways to reduce heat stress.

  • Australian sweet lupins (Lupinus angustifolius L.) are currently utilised as a valuable protein source in pig diets.

  • Water is the most important nutrient for pigs. When we think of nutrients we often only think about pig feed: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals and vitamins.

  • The genetic potential of pigs can have a major influence on the productivity and profitability of a pig enterprise.

  • Pigs encounter humans in varying degrees on farm and at the abattoir. The consequence of pigs being handled negatively before slaughter is a reduction in pork quality.

  • Mycotoxins are secondary toxic chemical products produced by organisms of fungal origin.

  • There are a number of factors that may contribute to pigs having high backfat (P2) and therefore graded fatter than what is required by the market.

  • Pigs suffering from salt poisoning or water deprivation can be severely affected and in some cases it can become fatal.