Pastures

Pastures play a major role in agricultural enterprises and contribute over $3 billion annually in Western Australia through animal production, improvements to crop rotations and conserved fodder. In a typical year pastures occupy up to half the land in low to medium rainfall areas and over two thirds of the land in high rainfall areas. Improved pastures are increasingly being used to play a more comprehensive role in farming systems to address emerging challenges for environment protection and food production.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is a world leader in pasture breeding and selection, grazing systems design and agronomic management of pastures. The department provides information, tools and resources to support the success of the agriculture sector in improving the productivity and profitability of pasture systems under both dryland and irrigated conditions. 

Articles

  • Saline lands in Western Australia (WA) often suffer winter waterlogging, with the levels of salinity and depth to watertable varying markedly both spatially and between seasons.

  • In September 2017, six department research officers presented at the biennial Australian Agronomy Conference in Ballarat, Victoria.

  • Management of weeds, disease and nitrogen nutrition are ongoing challenges that limit yield potential.

  • The Greener Pastures project was set up to assist the Australian dairy industry meet the two major challenges in managing high performing pasture systems: maintaining profitability while meeting th

  • Whole farm nutrient mapping helps graziers make informed nutrient management decisions.

  • Estimating or measuring soil texture provides valuable information about soil properties affecting crop and pasture growth. Soil texture affects the movement and availability of air, nutrients and

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development and the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage surveyed erosion and rangeland condition in the West Kimberley region in 1972.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is planning for the future of irrigated agriculture development in the Pilbara, recently completing a three-year investigation into irr

  • Three-quarters of high rainfall (more than 600mm annual rainfall) clover pastures in Western Australia do not need additional phosphorus for optimal plant growth.

  • In the high rainfall south-west of Western Australia, especially on sandy soils, the most commonly used nitrogen and phosphorus fertilisers can be leached into the groundwater and washed into water

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